Look at you. You’re young. And you’re scared. Why are you so scared? Stop being paralyzed. Stop swallowing your words. Stop caring what other people think. Wear what you want. Say what you want. Listen to the music you want to. Play it loud as fuck and dance to it. Go out for a drive at midnight and forget that you have school the next day. Stop waiting for Friday. Live now. Do it now. Take risks. Tell secrets. This life is yours. When are you going to realize that you can do whatever you want? Louise Flory

people are programmed to have feelings of boredom, usually from watching too much television during childhood. why? boredom = sales.

you have no reason to be bored, ever. you have a crazy powerful mind and you live in a crazy beautiful world. bravery or boredom? pick one.

SYMBIOSIS by THE VLC

symbiosis is an album of retro sounding synth music. it’s along the lines of sunthousand but with some darker sounding moods. this album was heavily influenced by old synth music from back when synthesizers were big machines that cost as much as vehicles. with this album, i was more interested in creating melodies and textures than beats and rhythms, attempting to create something with more of an aura, something that sounded like it was recorded and processed on old reel-to-reel tape machines.

http://theveryloudcoma.bandcamp.com/album/symbiosis

it’s funny, it says in the lobby in my building to not let anyone in the building who looks “suspicious.” which is funny cuz what does that really mean? anybody could look suspicious to someone else. i probably look suspicious to some people. i say, fuck worrying about “suspicious” people, that doesn’t really mean much—i say, don’t let in people holding clipboards. if someone comes into your building holding a clipboard, you know exactly what they are coming into your building for… lol. :)

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★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ✫★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ☆★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★✢✣✤✥✱✲✳✴✵✷✸✹ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ✮✮✮✮✮ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ✖★✻ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★☆✦✧ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ✻★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★✳ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★✵ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★★★★★★★★★★★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★✿ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ✿✿✿✿✿✿✿✿✿✿✿✿✿✿✿✿✿✿✿✿✿✿✿ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ❋❊❉❈❆❅❄★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ✼✼✽❀❁❂❃❄❅❆❇❈❈★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★❋❊❉❈❇❆ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ✵✴★✴✵ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★❋★❋★❋★❋ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ✵✴★✴✵ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★☆★☆★☆ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ✧✩✧✩✧✩✧✩✧✩ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★ ᏴᏞᏌᎬ ᏢᎩᏒᎪᎷᎥᎠ ᏞᎾᏙᎬᏚᏦᎩ ★

facebook amnesia: a state of confusion felt while looking through your news feed and seeing posts from facebook friends that you can’t even remember adding. not remembering why they are connected to you, where they came from, who they are, where they live, or in what capacity you’ve met them in real life.

9 Mind-Bending Epiphanies That Turned My World Upside-Down

This is all really good stuff to understand. I stole it directly from here: http://expandedconsciousness.com/2013/10/10/9-mind-bending-epiphanies-that-turned-my-world-upside-down/ :D

1. You are not your mind.

The first time I heard somebody say that, I didn’t like the sound of it one bit. What else could I be? I had taken for granted that the mental chatter in my head was the central “me” that all the experiences in my life were happening to.

I see quite clearly now that life is nothing but passing experiences, and my thoughts are just one more category of things I experience. Thoughts are no more fundamental than smells, sights and sounds. Like any experience, they arise in my awareness, they have a certain texture, and then they give way to something else.
If you can observe your thoughts just like you can observe other objects, who’s doing the observing? Don’t answer too quickly. This question, and its unspeakable answer, are at the center of all the great religions and spiritual traditions.

2. Life unfolds only in moments.

Of course! I once called this the most important thing I ever learned. Nobody has ever experienced anything that wasn’t part of a single moment unfolding. That means life’s only challenge is dealing with the single moment you are having right now. Before I recognized this, I was constantly trying to solve my entire life — battling problems that weren’t actually happening. Anyone can summon the resolve to deal with a single, present moment, as long as they are truly aware that it’s their only point of contact with life, and therefore there is nothing else one can do that can possibly be useful. Nobody can deal with the past or future, because, both only exist as thoughts, in the present. But we can kill ourselves trying.

3. Quality of life is determined by how you deal with your moments, not which moments happen and which don’t.

I now consider this truth to be Happiness 101, but it’s amazing how tempting it still is to grasp at control of every circumstance to try to make sure I get exactly what I want. To encounter an undesirable situation and work with it willingly is the mark of a wise and happy person. Imagine getting a flat tire, falling ill at a bad time, or knocking something over and breaking it — and suffering nothing from it. There is nothing to fear if you agree with yourself to deal willingly with adversity whenever it does show up. That is how to make life better. The typical, low-leverage method is to hope that you eventually accumulate power over your circumstances so that you can get what you want more often. There’s an excellent line in a Modest Mouse song, celebrating this side-effect of wisdom: As life gets longer, awful feels softer.

4. Most of life is imaginary.

Human beings have a habit of compulsive thinking that is so pervasive that we lose sight of the fact that we are nearly always thinking. Most of what we interact with is not the world itself, but our beliefs about it, our expectations of it, and our personal interests in it. We have a very difficult time observing something without confusing it with the thoughts we have about it, and so the bulk of what we experience in life is imaginary things. As Mark Twain said: “I’ve been through some terrible things in my life, some of which actually happened.” The best treatment I’ve found? Cultivating mindfulness.

5. Human beings have evolved to suffer, and we are better at suffering than anything else.

Yikes. It doesn’t sound like a very liberating discovery. I used to believe that if I was suffering it meant that there was something wrong with me — that I was doing life “wrong.” Suffering is completely human and completely normal, and there is a very good reason for its existence. Life’s persistent background hum of “this isn’t quite okay, I need to improve this,” coupled with occasional intense flashes of horror and adrenaline are what kept human beings alive for millions of years. This urge to change or escape the present moment drives nearly all of our behavior. It’s a simple and ruthless survival mechanism which works exceedingly well for keeping us alive, but it has a horrific side effect: human beings suffer greatly by their very nature. This, for me, redefined every one of life’s problems as some tendril of the human condition. As grim as it sounds, this insight is liberating because it means: 1) that suffering does not necessarily mean my life is going wrong, 2) that the ball is always in my court, so the degree to which I suffer is ultimately up to me, and 3) that all problems have the same cause and the same solution.

6. Emotions exist to make us biased.

This discovery was a complete 180 from my old understanding of emotions. I used to think my emotions were reliable indicators of the state of my life — of whether I’m on the right track or not. Your passing emotional states can’t be trusted for measuring your self-worth or your position in life, but they are great at teaching you what it is you can’t let go of. The trouble is that emotions make us both more biased and more forceful at the same time. Another survival mechanism with nasty side-effects.

7. All people operate from the same two motivations: to fulfill their desires and to escape their suffering.

Learning this allowed me to finally make sense of how people can hurt each other so badly. The best explanation I had before this was that some people are just bad. What a cop-out. No matter what kind of behavior other people exhibit, they are acting in the most effective way they are capable of (at that moment) to fulfill a desire or to relieve their suffering. These are motives we can all understand; we only vary in method, and the methods each of us has at our disposal depend on our upbringing and our experiences in life, as well as our state of consciousness. Some methods are skillful and helpful to others, others are unskillful and destructive, and almost all destructive behavior is unconscious. So there is no good and evil, only smart and dumb (or wise and foolish.) Understanding this completely shook my long-held notions of morality and justice.

8. Beliefs are nothing to be proud of.

Believing something is not an accomplishment. I grew up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they’re really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because “strength of belief” is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you’ve made it a part of your ego. Listen to any “die-hard” conservative or liberal talk about their deepest beliefs and you are listening to somebody who will never hear what you say on any matter that matters to them — unless you believe the same. It is gratifying to speak forcefully, it is gratifying to be agreed with, and this high is what the die-hards are chasing. Wherever there is a belief, there is a closed door. Take on the beliefs that stand up to your most honest, humble scrutiny, and never be afraid to lose them.

9. Objectivity is subjective.

Life is a subjective experience and that cannot be escaped. Every experience I have comes through my own, personal, unsharable viewpoint. There can be no peer reviews of my direct experience, no real corroboration. This has some major implications for how I live my life. The most immediate one is that I realize I must trust my own personal experience, because nobody else has this angle, and I only have this angle. Another is that I feel more wonder for the world around me, knowing that any “objective” understanding I claim to have of the world is built entirely from scratch, by me. What I do build depends on the books I’ve read, the people I’ve met, and the experiences I’ve had. It means I will never see the world quite like anyone else, which means I will never live in quite the same world as anyone else — and therefore I mustn’t let outside observers be the authority on who I am or what life is really like for me. Subjectivity is primary experience — it is real life, and objectivity is something each of us builds on top of it in our minds, privately, in order to explain it all. This truth has world-shattering implications for the roles of religion and science in the lives of those who grasp it.

LAXYSHINE

LAXYSHINE

IDIOSYNCRASIES

IDIOSYNCRASIES

History is the lie commonly agreed upon. Voltaire

The best way to get approval is not to need it.

This is equally true in art and business. And love. And sex. And just about everything else worth having.

Hugh MacLeod

“The most important thing a creative per­son can learn professionally is where to draw the red line that separates what you are willing to do, and what you are not.

Art suffers the moment other people start paying for it. The more you need the money, the more people will tell you what to do. The less control you will have. The more bullshit you will have to swallow. The less joy it will bring. Know this and plan accordingly.” — Hugh MacLeod

“One of the interesting things about success is that we think we know what it means. A lot of the time our ideas about what it would mean to live successfully are not our own. They’re sucked in from other people. And we also suck in messages from everything from the television to advertising to marketing, etcetera.

These are hugely powerful forces that define what we want and how we view ourselves. What I want to argue for is not that we should give up on our ideas of success, but that we should make sure that they are our own. We should focus in on our ideas and make sure that we own them, that we’re truly the authors of our own ambitions. Because it’s bad enough not getting what you want, but it’s even worse to have an idea of what it is you want and find out at the end of the journey that it isn’t, in fact, what you wanted all along.” — Alain de Botton

“What you should not do, I think, is worry about the opinion of anyone beyond your friends. You shouldn’t worry about prestige. Prestige is the opinion of the rest of the world.

Prestige is like a powerful magnet that warps even your beliefs about what you enjoy. It causes you to work not on what you like, but what you’d like to like.

Prestige is just fossilized inspiration. If you do anything well enough, you’ll make it prestigious. Plenty of things we now consider prestigious were anything but at first. Jazz comes to mind—though almost any established art form would do. So just do what you like, and let prestige take care of itself.

Prestige is especially dangerous to the ambitious. If you want to make ambitious people waste their time on errands, the way to do it is to bait the hook with prestige. That’s the recipe for getting people to give talks, write forewords, serve on committees, be department heads, and so on. It might be a good rule simply to avoid any prestigious task. If it didn’t suck, they wouldn’t have had to make it prestigious.” — Paul Graham